.

CEILING EXCEL FORMULA

EXCEL FORMULA
Function Dictionary Function Examples Function Categories

CEILING

     
 
 
Number Raised Up
2.1 3  =CEILING(C4,1)
1.5 2  =CEILING(C5,1)
1.9 2  =CEILING(C6,1)
20 30  =CEILING(C7,30)
25 30  =CEILING(C8,30)
40 60  =CEILING(C9,30)
What Does It Do ?          
This function rounds a number up to the nearest multiple specified by the user.
Syntax            
=CEILING(ValueToRound,MultipleToRoundUpTo)
The ValueToRound can be a cell address or a calculation.
Formatting          
No special formatting is needed.
Example 1          
The following table was used by a estate agent renting holiday apartments.
The properties being rented are only available on a weekly basis.
When the customer supplies the number of days required in the property the =CEILING()
function rounds it up by a multiple of 7 to calculate the number of full weeks to be billed.
Days Required Days To
Be Billed
Customer 1 3 7  =CEILING(D28,7)
Customer 2 4 7  =CEILING(D29,7)
Customer 3 10 14  =CEILING(D30,7)
Example 2          
The following table was used by a builders merchant delivering products to a construction site.
The merchant needs to hire trucks to move each product.
Each product needs a particular type of truck of a fixed capacity.
Table 1 calculates the number of trucks required by dividing the Units To Be Moved by
the Capacity of the truck.
This results of the division are not whole numbers, and the builder cannot hire just part
of a truck.
Table 1
Item Units To
Be Moved
Truck
Capacity
Trucks
Needed
Bricks 1000 300 3.33  =D45/E45
Wood 5000 600 8.33  =D46/E46
Cement 2000 350 5.71  =D47/E47
Table 2 shows how the =CEILING() function has been used to round up the result of
the division to a whole number, and thus given the exact amount of trucks needed.
Table 2
Item Units To
Be Moved
Truck
Capacity
Trucks
Needed
Bricks 1000 300 4  =CEILING(D54/E54,1)
Wood 5000 600 9  =CEILING(D55/E55,1)
Cement 2000 350 6  =CEILING(D56/E56,1)
Example 3          
The following tables were used by a shopkeeper to calculate the selling price of an item.
The shopkeeper buys products by the box.
The cost of the item is calculated by dividing the Box Cost by the Box Quantity.
The shopkeeper always wants the price to end in 99 pence.
Table 1 shows how just a normal division results in varying Item Costs.
Table 1
Item Box Qnty Box Cost Cost Per Item
Plugs 11 £20 1.81818  =D69/C69
Sockets 7 £18.25 2.60714  =D70/C70
Junctions 5 £28.10 5.62000  =D71/C71
Adapters 16 £28 1.75000  =D72/C72
Table 2 shows how the =CEILING() function has been used to raise the Item Cost to
always end in 99 pence.
Table 2
Item In Box Box Cost Cost Per Item Raised Cost
Plugs 11 £20 1.81818 1.99
Sockets 7 £18.25 2.60714 2.99
Junctions 5 £28.10 5.62000 5.99
Adapters 16 £28 1.75000 1.99
 =INT(E83)+CEILING(MOD(E83,1),0.99)
Explanation          
=INT(E83) Calculates the integer part of the price.
=MOD(E83,1) Calculates the decimal part of the price.
=CEILING(MOD(E83),0.99) Raises the decimal to 0.99

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